Zero waste transition Part 1

 

I think Bea Johnson is absolutely inspirational and I watch her household video that I wrote about last year OVER and OVER and OVER AGAIN. I just want my house to look that that. Now.

But of course, Bea herself admits that it has been a massive journey to get to that amazing household destination.

Here’s how we have started.  And please note, I don’t receive any commissions on any product recommendations below.

Bea’s first point is to refuse anything that goes to landfill coming into the house. Sheesh. Big ask. No-one in my household, apart from my oldest teenage daughter was into it at all, so I decided to start with refusing things that were completely in my control.

My fortnightly grocery shopping.

I’m a big cook-from-scratch kind of girl, so I thought this part would be easy peasy. I found that it was not, and I had to spend some considerable time researching in my local area to find some answers.

Firstly – the only store that provides foods in bulk, that I know of, is our local Food Co-op. There’s a new store called Nude Food, but I am a loyal co-oper.  I like their values.

So to complete my Co-op shop I either take to the shop some of these:

Breathable fruit and veg bags

Images courtesy of www.Onya.com.au and www.thehospitalityshop.com.au

Or larger bags to carry produce in (bottom right hand corner).

I’ve been unable to source some calico bags for flour and sugar, but they are on my wish list. In the meantime, I take glass jars (top right hand corner) to purchase these products.

I purchased a whole heap of glass jars from cheapo shops, but have found that their closures aren’t as good as the good quality homewares shops, so as they break down, I am replacing them with good quality jars like the one shown.

The Food Co-op then weigh the size of the jar and deduct it from your purchase.

I find at the Co-op I can purchase my bread making flour in bulk, as well as most of my dry goods like other flours, sugar, cacoa, pulses and legumes, spices and definitely their delicious organic dark chocolate covered almonds……

Then I shop at either the local farmers market or our fresh food markets. Here again, I take my produce bags, shopping bags and glass Pyrex containers to get my meat in. I find the organic meat shops are more used to these type of random requests (like please don’t wrap my meat in plastic and paper – put in my glassware instead please). Buying meat this way is a heavy job – usually I do the fruit and veg shopping first, empty my trolley into the car and then go and do the meat shopping.

That way, I can put the meat straight into the freezer or the fridge without any plastic wrapping or Styrofoam bases.

When I purchase bread (my husband doesn’t like my sour dough, even though it gets rave reviews from others!!) I go to Bakers Delight, ask them to cut up my bread and put it straight into my shopping bag. I’ve had to educate a couple of people on why I am doing it (saving the planet one plastic bag at a time) but now they joke that I am the crazy bag lady and it’s a bit of a novelty for them.

Once I come home from the fresh food shop, I do spend half an hour to an hour cutting up vegetables and making sure they are stored in glass containers in the fridge. You can’t store your veggies in the Onya bags because the bags are breathable and they go all limp….

Finally, last but least I do any other product shopping at Aldi or Woolworths. I look for recyclable packaging. Eg do you know that Aldi pasta packaging is recyclable? I finally put all of my shopping away in their containers, empty out any packets or packaging that I have begrudgingly had to purchase.

As I go around, putting my shopping away, I leave out any plastic, unrecyclable packaging that is going straight to landfill and I put it on a list to explore next time. The next time I go shopping, I look for alternatives, one product at a time, to reduce the overwhelming feeling of trying to zero waste everything at once.

zero waste list

I’m still looking for a gummy bears solution… my husband eats four packets a week…..

Anyway I hope you and your loved ones had a great Christmas break and New Year. My posting schedule will be fortnightly again this year (although I want to sneak in a review of this most beautiful book that I have been relishing over summer next week….). I look forward to hearing from you if you have any zero waste challenges or tips for me.

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Zero waste – a slow journey to reducing our contribution to landfill

IMG_3258For some time I have been admiring this minimalist home – it’s sleek, completely uncluttered and uncomplicated. It just looks relaxing. Relaxed people must live in it. And of course it has become my dream to live in such a house. Until I tried it. Let me tell you about our zero waste journey.

Bea Johnson is an environment activist, first tackling her own domestic waste, and then inspiring domestic waste reduction around the world. It started with her own journey, then a blog and ultimately a book, which I purchased a few months ago.

The key principles are this:

  • Refuse what you do not need
  • Reduce what you do need
  • Reuse what you do use
  • Recycle what you cannot reuse
  • Rot what you do use

The Johnson family produce a small jar of rubbish that goes to landfill every year. It’s astonishing, isn’t it. A family of four living in the US. THEY DON’T HAVE A BIN. Digest that for a bit.

The crazy thing is that I thought we were doing awfully well as our family of seven to have two recycling bins and a small bin that goes to landfill. Every week. Every week, our family produces such a considerable amount of waste that goes to landfill and masses of recycling.

And I thought we were doing so well, because our recycling bins were double the size of our landfill bin, until I saw this other YouTube clip produced by a really fun and smart environmental scientist that tells me how much oil and carbon that my recycling produces. Sigh. Recycling has become good, but not quite good enough.

So, about eight weeks ago, I embarked on getting our house to a zero waste stage. What I learned I this journey, is that it is actually incredibly admirable to aspire to a zero waste lifestyle….. and the journey to get there can be quite stressful. Over the next few posts I will write about our experience, and how (spoiler alert) we have opted to strive for a low waste household, rather than a zero waste one. I’m quite happy with this realistic compromise.

One thing I found about Bea’s incredible bible on how to get to a Zero Waste home, is that it skips over the getting to zero part quite quickly. I thought I would share with you how we got to our alternative proposition.

And because it is that time of the year, I hope you all have a wonderful break and spend quality, slow time with your loved ones. Take care and see you in 2016.

Part 5: Retirement planning (or for younger people – financial independence planning!)

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Last financial post for a little while. Well – just for a few weeks…

This week I’m thinking about retirement. I’m really thinking about it because I am having a little mid-life retirement right now, and I’m on the other side of forty.

A couple of things have happened to spur me into action to think about retirement planning at the wee age of 42.

  1. When I was on the treadmill of full time work, I had no idea of how much money I was aiming for, to save for our retirement. If you find yourself in a job that doesn’t thrill you each day, this question about how much money you need in retirement comes into sharper focus (when can you get the hell out of your work place).
  2. At 42, I also had more of an idea of the type of lifestyle I want to live in the second half of my life. And for us, the second half of our lives is less about career and more about fulfilment. It’s less about keeping up with the soccer mums and more about spending time with my family. Being clear on the type of life we want to live means that I can be more realistic about what living expenses I will need

I will ‘fess up. I spreadsheeted our life in excel right out to my husband’s death. I thought about a comfortable retirement where we owned our own house, travelled once a year internationally and pottered about Australia every now and then. I made provisions for:

  • A contribution to either the children’s education or a deposit on a home, given how difficult that is. To do that, I have planned to lock away $20k per child in a growth account until they require it
  • An upgrade to our existing house – it needs a new kitchen, bathroom and ensuite need an update, and possibly the exterior verandah and steps. It’s a 25 year old house and things are starting to peel/chip/rust/corrode/rot – you get the picture
  • $200k to down size and upgrade our house as our birds leave the nest – not sure when this will be, to be honest. But when it happens, I’m keen to live in a house that is consistent with our values like minimalism, leaving a minimal environment footprint and self-sufficiency.
  • We will need to get cars at some point in the future. I’ve budgeted $50k for that, because I know that we will get something second hand or an electric car.

So all up, we need an extra $500k on top of what we need to live on, to meet our anticipated living expenses between now and retirement.

Following these calculations, we went to see a trusted financial planner (word of mouth).

We looked intently at our superannuation pensions and realised that my husband (who I now love a little bit more) has a great pension that he can start to access in five years that will meet our living expenses.

We already have savings. In summary, this means is that we need to save another $440k to meet our anticipated capital or lump sum expenses, maintain our private health insurance and combined with the pensions we will have a standard of living that is equivalent to $100k per annum in five years’ time – and for now, it’s tax free income.

So let’s work backwards. If my husband and I continue to work full time/part time over the next five years, we should be able to save approximately $50-$70k per annum. That will mean that by my husband’s pension age, we will have between $250k – $350k in the bank towards those capital outlays, sans any interest that we have earned.

Come early retirement time, we will need to earn between us around $50k extra per year for 3-5 years to make sure our capital lump sums are taken care of. That’s a very part time job for me at the ripe old age of 48. My husband will be 55.

Prior to completing these calculations, I felt like I was on a working full time treadmill until the ripe old age of 65 at least. The purpose of completing these calculations was to see whether or not that treadmill for life was actually necessary – and guess what – it’s not.

By gritting your teeth through the boring bit of looking at the figures, and getting some advice, you can predict to the greatest extent that’s possible in this uncertain world – what the second half of your life can look like. A part time job for both of us enables us to pursue our passions (volunteering, travel, music, doing up old cars, growing veggies) and taking the slow road in life. It was this calculation that enabled me to take this recent career break and reassess the way we want to live.

Here is the calculation in summary:

  • Current expenses, and then add an inflationary multiplier each year (I chose 3%). Extrapolate out to the time that these expenses are relevant and then reassess. For example, I calculated that we will have kids requiring full care for the next eight years and after that, they will be making some contribution to their own living expenses, therefore our overall expenses will be less. Extrapolate that new figure out until the average survival rates for men and women in your country.
  • Think about the big lump sums that are coming your way in the future. Home upgrade? Medical procedures? Big travel plans? Replacing cars? Home renovations? Contribution to children education expenses? Still paying off the mortgage? When will that be complete? Total this amount.
  • Now add in current income with a wage increase (I used 2% to be conservative)

If you set up the spreadsheet horizontally, and add in when lump sums will occur, you can actually forecast when your cash will be called upon, and the cumulative cash flow position of your family.

Add in when you will start receiving superannuation pensions and there you have the best prediction of your family cash flow. Here’s a blank version of how I set up this sexy spreadsheet:

retirement calcs post tax
Kirsti 43 44 45 46
Husband 50 51 52 53
CPI 0.03
2016 2017 2018 2019
Expense
Capital exp
Extra travel
Kids savings
Renovations
Replacement cars
Total capital
Income required
Salaries
Husband   current income
Kirsti’s current income
Income total
Pensions
Husband pension
Lump sums
Kirsti’s pension
Total pensions
Surplus/shortfall
Carry forward (savings)
Return on savings

I’ve extrapolated this out until my husband’s death at 87…. (cheeky!)

I cannot stress the importance of getting good financial advice. Without ours, we would not have realised how good my husband’s superannuation fund was and how early it was going to enable us to retire.

Now to be clear, retirement for me isn’t about heading off to the golf course and playing bowls at the age of 48 (although if you love golf and bowls, go for it). Retirement for me is retiring from the ball and chain of full time work that I am resentful of. Retirement for me is financial freedom, part time work and the time, space and money to focus on the things that truly bring me joy and fun.

Perhaps this position is best summed up as financial independence and the freedom to live your life as you choose.

Part 4 – net worth tracking (stop yawning)

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As part of my five part series on family financial management, today’s post is about net worth tracking.

One of the biggest questions that I have turned my mind to over the past eighteen months or so is our family’s net worth – that is – our family balance sheet. It’s a bit like putting a business lens over your family finances and seeing whether the family company is actually growing its asset base.

So net worth tracking – what is it, and how do you do it?

It sounds so fancy, but simply put, your family net worth is calculated by deducting your liabilities from your assets, and bingo – that is your family net worth.

So, why should I go to the trouble of working out what our net worth value is? Five simple reasons:

  1. At any given point in time, you can see whether you are growing your family assets and achieving your financial goals. You can also critically examine composition of your assets, for example and see whether you have any over exposure in terms of risk that you may want to readjust.
  2. You can also see whether you are financially going backwards. For example if property values are falling and you are only making interest only payments on your mortgage (the principal is not reducing) you are going backwards, financially. If you want to change the situation, by tracking your net worth, you will be alerted to this situation and will be able to re-jig your finances accordingly.
  3. Net worth calculations will keep you honest and real about your financial situation if you track it over time. It’s easy to redraw cash on the mortgage to pay for an overseas holiday or put a pool in (we have done this one!) and continue to dip into your redraw facility like it is free cash without any consideration of the long term financial impacts for you and your family. Watching your net worth stagnant over time as a result is an eye opener. We did this for about three years. A combination of seeing our static family balance sheet and a strong urge to spend more quality time with family and less time at work propelled us into action (the Year of Austerity) and beyond.
  4. Net worth calculations are super important in retirement planning. I’ve found that being on this side of 40 has really sharpened my interest in knowing whether I will have enough money to seriously retire and focus on projects that I am actually interested in.
  5. It’s important for estate planning. Perhaps for my generation, intergenerational wealth has not seemed as necessary (I’m a self-starter and have made my own way in this world financially) but for our children, market predictions on employment prospects and economic growth generally are looking a bit bleak. I’d like to think that I will have some $$ to leave all of our five kids as a back-up fund for them and their future families in times of hardship.

For the purposes of being a useful calculation, you want to not include the short term, small assets that can seriously fluctuate at any given point in time. For example, our “trading” account, where our salaries are paid into and our credit card is paid out of, can wildly fluctuate between $12k and $50 depending on what time of the month it is, and whether we have paid our credit card recently. Because this could overstate or understate our net worth position at any time, I leave it out of our calculations.

Similarly, on the liabilities side, we pay off our credit card in full every month and it could have either $2k on it, or $9k, so again, I leave it out of our net worth calculation.

If, on the other hand, the credit card was not being paid off each and every month, and had become core debt – a long standing liability – then I would definitely deduct it off the family asset balance, because by not including it, I would not be viewing the true family financial position.

So, again, in the interests of being open and transparent, for our family, I’ll share our net worth position as at today.

Six monthly I usually do a little bit of my own real estate research to estimate the value of our family home and I use our six monthly superannuation balances to calculate super. I have to say, since the Year of Austerity and paying off our mortgage, we look financially under control and I like that.

Our net worth looks something like this:

Assets

Family home                                                      $700k

Savings account                                                $ 61K

Superannuation                                               $556k

Shares                                                                  $   5k

Total                                                                      $1.322m

Minus Liabilities

Core credit card debt                                     $0

Mortgage                                                            $0

Net worth                                                           $1.322m

 

Now I realise for some this is as boring as bat shit. But for me, it completely motivated me to think about running our family like a business so I could absolutely understand the goal posts of what we needed to save to retire (see next fortnight’s post); what we needed to budget for in the short term and therefore how much I needed to work and most importantly HOW MUCH TIME I COULD ACTUALLY SPEND WITH MY BEAUTIFUL FAMILY and not feel guilty about whether I had planned financially for the future.

I was easily prepared to be very bored to work that all out!

Give it a go, and tell me what you think. For some it will be facing the music but the music won’t go away by ignoring it.  For others, it might be quite surprising and liberating….

Quick empties update

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You might remember that I blogged here about my obscene ownership of way too many cosmetics…..

I realised that I was making great progress simplifying many areas of my life, but there were still areas of consumption that I was virtually blind to.  I really love this process of simplifying, because the new “normal” is challenged after the passage of time, a bit of adaptation and some furthering thinking about consumption.  It’s a lovely, thoughtful process.

Anyways, I thought I would post an update on my progress. This drawer contains my empties.  As you can see, in six or so weeks a little bit of progress has been made, but man I’ve got a heap to get through.

I’ve realised that in order to get through THE LOT I am going to have to think of some creative ways to use all of my cosmetics and beauty products. One idea I thought of is to use excess moisturiser as conditioner, when my conditioner runs out.

One really interesting challenge is that I have that I have plenty of half used lipsticks…Any ideas? Facial toner?

Part 3 – Where to from here now that our income has been halved

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Where has the time gone! The first three weeks of not working have been really busy – in a productive way. I’ll write about that later.

But for now, I wanted to update you on the family budget now that our income has been halved and I am not working – part 3 of my financial series.

As I mentioned, we have been to see a financial advisor on our superannuation and retirement needs, particularly now that David is nearly 50 and I am nearly 43. It’s important to understand the long game, and to understand how hard we have to work (or not work!) to ensure that we have both a reasonable standard of living now and in our retirement.

Main changes: I have reduced our food budget, and my mobile plan. There is not a lot of wriggle room in this budget – by the time we also get our allowances (which have also reduced) we have about $1000 spare per month. I intend to build this as a bit of a cash flow to help us on the heavier months when we have more expenses.

So our one income budget looks like this:

Expenses   yearly monthly fortnightly
26 2
Car rego $ 2,200.00 $       84.62
Car insurance $ 1,100.00 $       42.31
House ins $ 1,100.00 $       42.31
car services $ 1,000.00 $       38.46
petrol $     120.00
Sundry $     300.00
fernwood $       24.00
internode $   75.00 $       37.50
mobile $   35.00 $       17.50
pocket money $       25.00
cleaning $       65.00
food $     400.00
electricity $ 1,200.00 $       46.15
gas $ 1,782.00 $       68.54
water $ 1,000.00 $       38.46
rates $ 1,300.00 $       50.00
primary school fees $ 100.00 $       50.00
piano $     600.00 $       23.08
netball $     350.00 $       26.00
health insurance $ 1,600.00 $       61.54
girls clothing $ 1,500.00 $       57.69
movies $     100.00
red cross $   25.00 $       12.50
guitar $     600.00 $       23.08
dancing $     400.00 $       15.38
oxfam $   25.00 $       12.50
Boys school fees $ 4,624.00 $     177.85
Girls school fees $ 550.00 $     275.00
Girls mobile $   30.00 $       15.00
foxtel $   50.00 $       25.00
gifts $ 3,000.00 $     115.38
boys expenses $ 200.00 $     100.00
total       $ 2,489.85

The main thing that I will focus on to reduce our food bill is to really cook from scratch. I like the health benefits of this as well, as I am really keen on reducing the amount of processed food that we buy. Things that I already cook from scratch include:

  • Bread – sour dough is may favourite
  • Yoghurt – greek and vanilla
  • Mozzarella
  • Pancetta
  • Biscuits and cakes for the children
  • Hommus (Yotam Ottolenghi’s  recipe is so yummy)
  • Preserves  – I preserve food when it is particularly season and tasty – like mangoes, apricots, peaches, tomatoes

The second way I will reduce the food budget is by buying in bulk from our local Food Co-operative. The food is organic and not packaged, which I really subscribe to. I take in my own jars and produce bags so there is no plastic packaging.

Finally, I will grow up to 50% of our fresh produce. My husband and I have just spent the weekend building three new vegetable beds. This weekend’s outlay has been around $1000 – I have spent all up around $2500 on the veggies beds – but they will pay themselves off in no time.

My job is to keep an eye on the family budget and to make sure that we are on track. Bottom line is if I don’t keep track of it, I am back to work so of course, keeping expenditure within budget is my number 1 priority! I am loving not working and providing really healthy produce for my family.

Part 2 – The year of austerity budget and the new normal

So following on from part 1 Financial Psychology, today’s post is about the actual numbers during the year of austerity and how we determined the family budget.

We did it using a principle called zero-based budgeting. Zero-based budgeting is very different to shaving your existing expenses, like reducing your fortnightly food bill from $500 to $450.

Zero based budgeting works on the principle that every line item in your budget needs to be challenged. Only after every budget line item is challenged with a logical argument, then an appropriate amount can be determined for that line item.

I’ll give you an example of our own home budget. And don’t judge here – I’m openly sharing the budget for the purposes of illustrating an example that works for us. I completely understand that everyone’s financial situation is different and people place different values on certain types of expenditure. This was our budget before we went through our zero-based budgeting exercise nearly a year ago. It was excessive. It was absolutely a budget for the 21st century busy family where things were outsourced for convenience, like cleaning and home delivery shopping, when both parents were busy working. And for many struggling on one income, even our reduced expenditure will seem excessive. But anyways, for the purpose of the example, here was our budget….

Expenses   yearly monthly fortnightly
26 2
Car rego $ 2,200.00 $       84.62
Car insurance $ 1,100.00 $       42.31
House ins $ 1,100.00 $       42.31
Car repairs $ 1,000.00 $       38.46
petrol $       80.00
Sundry $     500.00
Child care $     378.46
fernwood $       24.00
internode $   75.00 $       37.50
mobile $   80.00 $       40.00
pocket money $       25.00
cleaning $     185.00
food $     800.00
electricity $ 1,200.00 $       46.15
gas $ 1,782.00 $       68.54
water $ 1,000.00 $       38.46
rates $ 1,300.00 $       50.00
primary school fees $ 155.00 $       77.50
piano $ 1,200.00 $       46.15
netball $     350.00 $       26.00
health insurance $ 1,600.00 $       61.54
girls clothing $ 1,000.00 $       38.46
movies $     100.00
red cross $   45.00 $       22.50
guitar $ 1,200.00 $       46.15
dancing $     800.00 $       30.77
Fred hollows $   35.00 $       17.50
World vision $   35.00 $       17.50
oxfam $   40.00 $       20.00
newspaper $     568.00 $       21.85
Boys school fees $ 4,624.00 $     177.85
Girls school fees $ 550.00 $     275.00
Girls mobile $   30.00 $       15.00
foxtel $   66.00 $       33.00
gifts $ 3,000.00 $     115.38
mortgage $     923.00
total       $ 4,545.96

And on top of this, my husband and I had amounts of cash deposited direct into our own accounts, for non-accountable spending – haircuts, clothes etc – our sanity allowances.

So as you can see with this budget – there was plenty of room for improvement.

From here, we went line by line and justified each and every expense. The conversation went something like this:

Cars: we still need two, because at times we are ferrying around 5 children and 2 adults, but let’s revisit once children start to get their own licences. Each car is getting on to ten years old, but serving us well. We will use the most economical car for the most amount of travel to reduce our petrol expenditure.

School fees – not negotiable. Not moving the kids from their schools for savings purposes. All kids are settled.

Food: ridiculous expenditure. Still a necessary budget item, but some significant savings can be made here. Resolution: shop only at Aldi and the fresh food markets and reduce to $500 per fortnight. No more home delivery… Savings: $300 per fortnight.

Utilities and rates – all still necessary expenses, but where possible, we will try and reduce our consumption. I’ll write about that later.

Kids extra-curricular activities – all not negotiable, and great for their health. No change.

Cleaner – loved having a great cleaner – and had a fabulous one. But with the risk of public service job cuts, we decided to save as much as possible and do the cleaning ourselves. I now pay the girls to help, we get it done in three hours and once I pay them, I save $120 per fortnight.

Sundry expenses: some sort of vortex going on here – a category for any other expense. Usually the case is money is spent because it is in my wallet. Coffees, the odd lunch out, kids school excursions, odd kid lunch money. Resolution: reduce to $300 per fortnight, savings: $200 per fortnight.

Girls’ clothing; instead of having a $1000 budget, we will only buy what is necessary to replace. No more weekend shopping-is-our-hobby. Anticipated savings: $500 per year.

Newspaper: can get it online. Saving of $568 per year.

Mobile phone; once my contract finishes this month, I will switch to an Aldi plan for $35 per month, savings $45 per month.

Health insurance: grrrr   – it stays.

Gifts: that stays, but we will look for savings.

Mortgage – this is our minimum repayment, and of course we pay four times this amount on our mortgage.

Ok, so for the year of austerity our zero based budget looked like this:

Expenses   yearly monthly fortnightly
26 2
Car rego $ 2,200.00 $       84.62
Car insurance $ 1,100.00 $       42.31
House ins $ 1,100.00 $       42.31
car services $ 1,000.00 $       38.46
childcare $     368.00
petrol $     100.00
Sundry $     300.00
fernwood $       24.00
internode $   75.00 $       37.50
mobile $   20.00 $       10.00
pocket money $       25.00
cleaning $       65.00
food $     350.00
electricity $ 1,200.00 $       46.15
gas $ 1,782.00 $       68.54
water $ 1,000.00 $       38.46
rates $ 1,300.00 $       50.00
primary school fees $ 155.00 $       77.50
piano $ 1,200.00 $       46.15
netball $     350.00 $       26.00
health insurance $ 1,600.00 $       61.54
girls clothing $     500.00 $       19.23
movies $     100.00
red cross $   25.00 $       12.50
guitar $ 1,200.00 $       46.15
dancing $     800.00 $       30.77
oxfam $   25.00 $       12.50
Boys school fees $ 4,624.00 $     177.85
Girls school fees $ 550.00 $     275.00
Girls mobile $   30.00 $       15.00
foxtel $   66.00 $       33.00
gifts $ 2,500.00 $       96.15
mortgage $     923.00
total       $ 3,642.69

Savings – just over $900 per fortnight, or $23,000 per year. Main reductions: cleaner, sundry items and food. We will suspend our Foxtel over the summer when football finishes, which will provide more savings. Another item that might get challenged next time we look at our zero based budgeting process again (it happens annually) is our movie night money, that usually is a cheap dinner out for the two of us and a movie. We might look to more eating at home and just the movie tickets, which is $35.

One of the interesting things that I will point out about this process, is that each stage of adjustment becomes the new “normal”. We had a higher budget that then first one a few years ago, let me tell you. I was easily able to justify our food expenditure at $1000 per fortnight because we have a large family. Our year of austerity for another family could be a year of luxury or a year of hell. It’s all relative.

By cooking with cheaper cuts of meat, using seasonal fruit and vegetables, and by producing my own fruit and vegetables, you can see our food bill has reduced substantially. But this reduction has been over time. As we got used to a new food bill level, we saw more opportunities to reduce it.

So – how do you budget and what do you find the most effective way of keeping control of your expenses?

The family finances – Financial Psychology part 1

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It’s a scary thing putting your family finances out there for all to see, but in the interests of encouraging others, I have developed a five part family finances series.

Part 1 – Financial psychology

Part 2 – The year of austerity budget and the new normal

Part 3 – Where to from here now that our income has been halved

Part 4 – Net worth tracking

Part 5 – Retirement planning

So the starting point for us:

We were both in the public service in middle to senior management levels. I’m not prepared to disclose our family income, but suffice to say that in household surveys we were always ticking the $250 000 and over box – and it was substantially over.

We moved in together with our blended family of seven in 2009, both reeling financially from two divorces with some superannuation and a mortgage of $350k against a house now worth about $700k.

Then we kind of financially dicked around a bit. We put in a new pool (above ground, but with a fancy deck); renovated some rooms, bought a second hand seven seater car and I realised mid-way through 2014 that we were still sitting at $140k on the mortgage some five years later, and had only managed to get through just over $200k, despite our reasonable income earning reality.

So – the year of austerity was born. Just like Greece, we decided to cut back on expenses and knock over the mortgage within a year. I can happily report that we have achieved our goal, which has enabled me to take the next year off work and spend some more time with my children, as well as potentially go back to work after that on a part time basis.

So what was the psychological shift that enabled us to make the transition? I read Your Money or Your Life: Transforming Your Relationship with Money and Achieving Financial Independence by Joe Dominguez and Vicki Robin and in a nutshell, I realised that each time I purchased a new item of clothing, something new for the house or bought a convenience meal that I was trading my life hours for money.

The premise is this: everyone only has a certain number of life hours available to them. Each time you purchase something, you are trading some life hours away. EG I could buy this nice $200 shirt that will bring me immediate pleasure, and perhaps the next two to three times that I wear it; but to get that enjoyment, I have to work for four hours (of half a day) to net that kind of cash. You add this up over a whole wardrobe, a new car, brand new kitchen appliances – you get my drift and you realise that you will need to work for most of your life to achieve short-lived consumption happiness.

The other thing I realised is that purchasing new things each pay day is like being on crack cocaine. It feels good at the time, and even the first few times that you use or wear your new thing – but then the “thing” you have purchased becomes a part of your new “normal” and you find yourself still craving for more. This is called hedonic happiness – short lived, but leaves you wanting for more. And it’s insatiable.

So the shift in gears in my mind has been two-fold:

  1. Each time I want to buy something, I think about is it worth the life hours – adding an extra half day/year/five years to my working life; and
  2. Is this purchase just for hedonistic reasons, or is it something that we actually need.

What have you learned about your financial self?

Cosmetics shame and empties challenge

So we went to the States in 2013, the AUD was holding up strong and everything was cheap including make-up and I wasn’t considering minimalism back then.

Oh and I am a GWP junkie. At least I was. A Gift With Purchase offer would have me hovering over a David Jones counter, pronto.

Consequently, in a small cupboard in my bathroom, I confronted a shameful fact today:

  1. I have 23 lipsticks
  2. I have over 50 containers (small/medium/large) of various moisturisers, creams, body lotions, shampoos and conditioners, facemasks, exfoliates, toner, makeup remover AND THEY ARE MY SPARE ONES.

It’s funny – simple living and paring back to the essentials is a process and not a project. Six months ago, I would have been proud of myself that I had organised them into neat little zip lock bags into their little categories.

Now, six months on, I am looking at them in horror. So much consumption. No end in sight in terms of getting to the bottom of the storage bin and just having one of everything, like a real minimalist.

Possibly, if I was hard core, I would think about donating them just to clear my clutter immediately. But I’m not hard core. I know I will use these products at some point in the very near future. So I have set myself an empties challenge. The challenge is:

No more makeup or moisturisers until all of the little bottles are used. I am going to set up a little bucket in my wardrobe to put the empties in, to remind myself of the challenge, and I will post on progress.

Here is some shameful before evidence:

all lipsticks

hair products

What is your shameful hoarding secret? (PS I’m sure I will continue to horrify myself as my expectations are reset with this simple living process).